Saturday, February 26, 2011

... bipolar disorder treatment in the philippines ... (psychiatrist, psychologist, psychotherapist, counselor, life coach)

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we all have our mood swings. sometimes, we feel unmotivated, gloomy or grouchy. at other times, we're all bubbly and energetic. there is a natural ebb and flow to our moods and this is a normal part of our lives.
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for some people however, the mood swings are too extreme. rather than an ebb and flow of moods, the mood swings become more like a rollercoaster ride with alpine peaks and abysmal valleys. for a period of time, they slump into a deep depression. and then after a while, they become as hyperactive as an energizer bunny on shabu. this type of mood swing isn't normal. this is a bipolar disorder.
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a bipolar disorder is caused by an imbalance of many brain chemicals- serotonin, adrenaline, dopamine, GABA, and many others. this brain chemical imbalance is usually triggered by physical, emotional, or mental stress. sometimes, it happens spontaneously even in the absence of stress.
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the depressive phase of a bipolar disorder is manifested with the following symptoms: sadness, absence of motivation, sleep pattern changes, appetite changes, energy level changes, lowered self-confidence, negative/pessismistic thinking, concentration problems, and thoughts of death or suicide.
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the manic phase of a bipolar disorder is manifested with the following symptoms: extreme bubbliness or grouchiness, decreased need for sleep, hyperactivity, extreme talkativity, thoughts jumping from one topic to another, and impulsive behaviors.
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bipolar disorder is easily treated with mood stabilizers. it is just a matter of finding the right mood stabilizers and the right dosages. once found, the person with bipolar disorder usually gets well within 2-3 weeks. a wholistic treatment package will consist of mood stabilizing medications, counseling/psychotherapy, relaxation and stress management strategies, and holistic wellness therapies.
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there are many people around us with bipolar disorder but we don't recognize them. that's because when they seriously comply with their treatment regimen, they exhibit no symptoms whatsoever. the goal of treatment is to help people with bipolar disorder live normal, functional, productive, happy, and meaningful lives-- and from my clinical experience, that goal is VERY possible!
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interview by abs-cbn's tv show "ted failon ngayon."
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16 comments:

  1. I am working on a research project about Bipolar Disorder and I experienced dealing with people with this kind of disorder. Do you think they belong to mentally ill patients? Thanks mood swings are normal to all people but bipolar as i know and experience from my clients and co-worker they are very dangerous. they cannot control and manage their anger and what's triggering them and a sudden shift of they thoughts as if they have possibilities to kill and in a mild state they tend to hurt people. and my co-worker in a black lady. And base on studies more prone and high percentage of this kind of this bipolar disorder are their race. i felt bad coz there are times if they chose to be good it's very nice to keep them as a friend but it's hard. anyway i hope i get more facts from your site to complete my research project. it is very interesting because most of the people here suffers from severe depression in life. Maybe the thing i can only can advice and can contribute to these kind of people with this kind of medical disorder. Is to think Happy and to practice to manage and control their anger and fight their depression..it's hard to do it but it might help. Thanks.

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  2. The problem of bipolar treatment is money if a patient belongs to a family who could not afford the medications the patient will become threat to the community and its family. Our local government sectors should have the funds to assist this families but they just spent the funds on pointless expenses.

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  3. The real problem is the people's lack of education, misguided thinking, and simple ignorance regarding Bipolar disorder. I frequently hear people joke among themselves that one of their friends is "so bipolar, talaga", but in one instance that I overheard this that what she actually meant to say was that her friend tend to vacillate when it came to deciding which restaurant to eat at and so she found that to be crazy not bipolar. People tend to forget how to think with a critical mind. That's why so many people get duped with false advertisements because almost nil of the population even thought of reading the conditions and terms of purchase or usage of service. They just buy it without questioning the ridiculously and overly doubtful advertisement claims. People tend to reason with their emotions or base them on cognitive distortions. I simply wish, that prior to applying unwarranted logic, that we all instead simply ask ourselves what it really is. I just hope, that one person, just for his own intellectual and personal improvement would spend a good amount of effort to really dig deep and get at least a notion of what Bipolar Disorder is. Then keep being curious and ask another question, research, process it, then present another facet to the question, research, research, research, find multiple answers or situations, then process it, process it in a different light, or et al. I must digress now. I was on a calm state, went on a slight manic, now I'm better. Was anyone harmed?

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  4. Kitson,

    Regarding your claim one high susceptibility of African-Americans (I hope you are aware that "blacks" are referred to Americans of African ancestry. I hope your not calling your friend/co-worker "black" when she might be from Nigeria, Sudan, Ghana, et al). I'm assuming you probably saw some statistics that predisposed bipolar disorder among blacks. But I must look into the underlying causes of that result, which I find more intriguing and relevant to discuss than a number. I hope sometime during your research you found some self-discovery because your research method seem to be tainted with various tainted logic. P.S. Please avoid patronizing people with disabilities.

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  5. “Okay, I’m going to feed off of the tragedy of Helena,” I decided.

    They say it takes one to know one. Though I did not end up dead, I had enough years of the downward spiral to make me look as another victim. But I am almost normal now. “Almost” because I am on maintenance medications still, I have low tolerance for stress already, and I cannot sleep too late anymore. If I act as though I am not in this state, the disorder’s manifestations would resurface again one way or another.

    If I were a reader of this piece, what would I be interested in? How it started? How I suffered? How it affected others? How I bounced back? How I managed to self-manage? How I processed my years of insanity as they say?

    At best I would point out my relationships with people as culprit—relationships that I took too seriously that when they broke down, I broke down. That’s how special and eventually heartbreaking they were.

    All the same, I had a depression at the disorder’s onset. I tried to figure what went wrong. I bothered people to analyze with me. I cried. I stopped being productive. I lost motivation. What could be worse? The other end of the spectrum? Mania’s impulsivity and thoughts and speech that kept on… despite the sleeplessness? No. The hallucinations were the worst.

    Although I still existed, it was like the end of my useful life because crazy was the judgment of the day. If I were crazy I would not have been pained by being deemed so. So I managed to humor myself with “If I’m crazy, then I’m saved.” Vindicated in thought. Yet still struggling to end the state of incapacity.

    The ability to function normally again in society seemed to be the measure by which the people around me judged that I was okay. Not knowing how to deal with me, they put their faith in instruments that they thought would help.

    Though not wanting to sound an ingrate, I know it was not the meds that primarily calmed me. It was God. It was the revelation after revelation about how I should deal with people including myself. It was the constant peeling off of layers of unforgiveness and self-absorption. It was the realization that the put downs should not have mattered had it all been for Him.

    It was God—through the Word, the preachers, the people that were close, and inspirational elements.

    I used to say, “What happened to me wasn’t the hardest, yet it broke me.” But He set me up to choose, to draw me near, to equip me to seek Him more. For what? The answers used to be visions for focus. Now they’re visions for guidance.

    When I kept on being bothered by the lack of closure and entertaining unrealistic elements, I lost focus. But God planted dreams in my heart. Now I’m back on track, with people not even having any hint of what I went through.

    Someone might dare to ask, “How do you know that you’re going to be okay for good, considering that the disorder is said to be life-long?” Dig this: “I assert my sanity in that I was confident enough to tell God I don’t know if I love You.” And He shared, “You love Me if you obey Me, and if you love Me it’s because I loved you first.”

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    1. What I just read now really helped me feel better. I have Bipolar Disorder and believed that I already have it since I was 7 or 8 years old, or even younger (I am 35 now). It was clinically diagnosed in 2011 when I did something serious as a result of mania. I have suicidal thoughts at the moment but I don't know why suddenly I tried to look for answers in internet, or I was trying to find help from others - support group or maybe just something to inspire me. I am a God-fearing person so the negative thoughts really make me guilty but I just can't control the emotions - anger, frustrations, emptiness - I am feeling now. But thank you for the inspiring message which reminds me that God is faithful even if most of the time we are faithless. God led me to this I know.

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    2. What I just read now really helped me feel better. I have Bipolar Disorder and believed that I already have it since I was 7 or 8 years old, or even younger (I am 35 now). It was clinically diagnosed in 2011 when I did something serious as a result of mania. I have suicidal thoughts at the moment but I don't know why suddenly I tried to look for answers in internet, or I was trying to find help from others - support group or maybe just something to inspire me. I am a God-fearing person so the negative thoughts really make me guilty but I just can't control the emotions - anger, frustrations, emptiness - I am feeling now. But thank you for the inspiring message which reminds me that God is faithful even if most of the time we are faithless. God led me to this I know.

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  6. i do have bipolar and the hardest part is that my mom doesnt support me on my medication. im just a student. i use my allowance for my medication. she told me that it is just in my head i was just thinking of it. oh crap, so here i am now, i stop taking my meds, nawawalan na ko ng pag asa. when you talk about bipolar, people would already think that im crazy.

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  7. http://pcij.org/blog/2006/09/21/bipolar-disorder-a-daughter-breaks-her-silence listen to this and it is very helpful

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  8. @Anonymous, you can ask help fom city councilors or from the Govt. like in Q.C. hall, SSDD Dept. they give free medicines go to Ateneo, they give free check up or in NCMH. God bless.

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  9. is there anyway to contact you or someone who could help. still trying to hang on but its hard and im in a very very deep pain right now. tried to reach out for family, her, friends, and anyone but no one cared. this feeling is so hard to bear anymore. days, weeks, months, years. as if they are really pushing me to end it all. is that how really they dont care or do they see me as a problem, burden, curse or something. im tired. badly looking for someone to talk to. to cry on. ;(

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    1. Hi Geron, please call 415-6529 immediately to make an appointment. This is my clinic number and I really want to help you. Tell my secretary/nurses that you want to make an urgent appointment because of your condition. It seems like you are experiencing major depression and I'd like to tell you that it is very easy to treat, but you need to be patient for the treatment to take effect. I hope to meet you soon. I'd really like to listen and understand the tough time you're going through so that I can help you in the best way possible. Please call now. And if the line is busy, please keep on trying. Sincerely, Randy :D

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    2. Hi Geron, please call 415-6529 immediately to make an appointment. This is my clinic number and I really want to help you. Tell my secretary/nurses that you want to make an urgent appointment because of your condition. It seems like you are experiencing major depression and I'd like to tell you that it is very easy to treat, but you need to be patient for the treatment to take effect. I hope to meet you soon. I'd really like to listen and understand the tough time you're going through so that I can help you in the best way possible. Please call now. And if the line is busy, please keep on trying. Sincerely, Randy :D

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  10. May bipolar disorder ako at gusto ko gumaling.... Dahil dito, muntik ko mapatay yung kapatid ko... Gusto gumaling but my problem is no one cares...ang sabi nila BALIW lang ako...My aunt have a bipolar disorder also and I think it is severe... I dont want to be like her...ALONE....

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  11. Erm... I want to be more specific, what are the most meds that ppl with bipolar disorder take? Coz I really want to get rid of this disorder. Thanks.

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  12. How would the school be able to handle bipolar college student that create misunderstanding among his classmates and teacher and twist situation against him?

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